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Deep Tissue Full Body Massage

Deep Tissue Full Body Massage

How does massage ease pain?

Massage seems to ease pain in several different ways. For starters, it can increase blood flow to sore, stiff joints and muscles, which are warmed by the extra circulation. As reported by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, animal studies have found that massage also triggers the release of natural painkillers called opioids in the brain. (The report doesn’t explain how scientists massage the animals.) Animal studies also suggest that massage speeds up the flow of oxytocin, a hormone that relaxes muscles and encourages feelings of calmness and contentment. As an aside, oxytocin happens to be the same hormone that flows through women before labor. It relaxes the uterus and helps cement the bond between mother and infant, earning it the nickname “love hormone.” Massage may also change the way the brain senses pain. As Stanford neuroscientist Robert Sapolsky has said, the short, sharp sensations of a good massage can temporarily make the brain forget about other aches.

How effective is massage for pain relief?

There’s little doubt that a good rub-down can ease pain and tightness in stressed, overworked muscles. Now there’s growing evidence that it can also help relieve chronic (long-lasting) pain, especially the lower-back variety. A study of 262 patients published in the Archives of Internal Medicine found that massage was far superior to acupuncture or patient education for relieving back pain. After 10 weeks, 74 percent of patients said massage was “very helpful.” Only 46 percent for those who received acupuncture and about 17 percent of those who read a self-help book had the same response. Massage patients were also four times less likely than other patients to report being bedridden with pain. The authors concluded that “massage might be an effective alternative to conventional medical care for persistent back pain.”

In a true test of its value, massage has even been shown to ease the chronic pain and other miseries suffered by cancer patients. A study of more than 1,200 patients at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center published in the Journal of Pain and Symptom Management found that massage reduces symptoms such as anxiety, nausea, and pain by about 50 percent.

Is massage safe?

Massage is very safe, especially when performed by an experienced, licensed professional. It’s not entirely risk-free, however. A study published in the journal Rheumatology found 16 separate cases where massage caused serious injuries, including nerve damage and, in one instance, a bruised liver. The study concluded that such complications are “true rarities” that are most likely to occur at the hands of laypeople, or the use of more forceful techniques such as shiatsu.

According to the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, massage can be hazardous for anyone with deep vein thrombosis, burns, skin infections, eczema, open wounds, broken bones, or advanced osteoporosis. Cancer patients should consult with their oncologists about the safety of massage therapy as there may be a greater risk of certain adverse effects, such as internal hemorrhage or the dislodging of blood clots. They can also ask for a referral to a massage therapist who has a certification in oncology massage, and works in conjunction with a medical school or cancer treatment program.

And although massage has been found useful for relieving the aches and stiffness that show up during pregnancy, some experts recommend waiting until the second trimester to receive prenatal massage. Also, check with your doctor or midwife before undergoing massage or any other new procedure. If he or she signs off on prenatal massage, look for a certified massage therapist who has an additional certification in prenatal massage.

Finally, the University of Washington Department of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine warns against massaging joints that are swollen or extremely painful. The university offers this advice: If massage causes pain, stop.

If you feel pain during a therapy session, tell your massage therapist immediately. You’re the expert on whether the treatment is helping or worsening your pain.

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